2018 Finalists2018-11-11T23:04:02+00:00

2018

Shortlist

The 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize jury announced its shortlist on Monday, October 1, 2018. The five titles were chosen from a longlist of 12 books announced in St. John’s, NL on September 17, 2018. One hundred and four titles were submitted from publishers across the country.

Published by House of Anansi Press

Patrick DeWitt

Biography

Patrick DeWitt was born on Vancouver Island in 1975. He is the author of three critically acclaimed novels: Undermajordomo Minor, Ablutions, and The Sisters Brothers, which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and the Stephen Leacock Medal, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Scotiabank Giller Prize. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

Jury Citation

A “tragedy of manners” about people out of sync in the world, this novel is disconcertingly funny. It strikes postures where a more conventional writer would have been sincere and humourless. Its subjects are effrontery, wealth, death and bad manners. Many of the greatest novels are about nothing so very important, and they last because they are done beautifully. French Exit shows Patrick deWitt’s literary mastery and perfect ear. It’s an immaculate performance on ice, executed with sharp shining blades, lutzing and pirouetting above unknowable black depths.

Excerpt

“All good things must end,” said Frances Price.

She was a moneyed, striking woman of sixty- five years, easing her hands into black calfskin gloves on the steps of a brownstone in New York City’s Upper East Side. Her son, Malcolm, thirty- two, stood nearby looking his usual broody and unkempt self. It was late autumn, dusk; the windows of the brownstone were lit, a piano sounded on the air— a tasteful party was occurring. Frances was explaining her early departure to a similarly wealthy though less lovely individual, this the hostess. Her name doesn’t matter. She was aggrieved.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from French Exit. Copyright © 2018 by Patrick DeWitt. Excerpted by permission of House of Anansi Press. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by QC Fiction, an imprint of Baraka Books

Eric Dupont

Biography

Born in 1970, Eric Dupont lives and works in Montreal. He has published 4 novels with Marchand de feuilles and in France with Éditions du Toucan and Éditions J’ai lu (Flammarion). He is a past winner of Radio-Canada’s “Combat des livres” (the equivalent of the CBC’s Canada Reads contest), a finalist for the Prix littéraire France-­Québec and the Prix des cinq continents, and a winner of the Prix des libraires and the Prix littéraire des collégiens. His fourth novel, Songs for the Cold of Heart (La fiancée américaine) translated by Peter McCambridge, has sold over 60,000 copies in Quebec alone.

Jury Citation

Once upon a time in Quebec there was a girl named Madeleine. A tiny red headed waif with only a suitcase in her possession steps off a train in a frozen village, and a strapping Quebec man falls head over heels in love with her strangeness. A baby is born from this union that is so big, it manages to kill both its parents in childbirth. As magnificent a work of irony and magic as the boldest works of Gabriel Garcí¬a Márquez, but with a wholly original sensibility that captures the marvellous obsessions of the Quebecois zeitgeist of the twentieth century. It is without any doubt, a tour de force. And the translation is as exquisite as a snowflake.

Excerpt

Years before her mother bundled her onto a coach bound for New York City in a December blizzard, Madeleine Lamontagne had been a little girl who loved Easter bunnies, Christmas trees, and the stories told by her dad, Louis Lamontagne. Nothing out of the ordinary there. After all, everyone loved to hear Louis “The Horse” Lamontagne’s tall tales. Before television, his stories were the best way to pass the time in Rivi.re-du-Loup.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Songs for the Cold of Heart. Copyright © 2018 by Eric Dupont. English translation by Peter McCambridge. Excerpted by permission of QC Fiction, an imprint of Baraka Books. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Patrick Crean Editions, an imprint of HarperCollins Canada

Esi Edugyan

Biography

Esi Edugyan won the Scotiabank Giller Prize in 2011 for her novel Half-Blood Blues. The novel was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize, the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Orange Prize for Fiction. The author lives in Victoria, BC.

Jury Citation

How often history asks us to underestimate those trapped there. This remarkable novel imagines what happens when a black man escapes history’s inevitable clasp – in his case, in a hot air balloon no less. Washington Black, the hero of Esi Edugyan’s novel is born in the 1800s in Barbados with a quick mind, a curious eye, and a yearning for adventure. In conjuring Black’s vivid and complex world – as cruel empires begin to crumble and the frontiers of science open like astounding vistas – Edugyan has written a supremely engrossing novel about friendship and love and the way identity is sometimes a far more vital act of imagination than the age in which one lives.

Excerpt

I might have been ten, eleven years old—I cannot say for certain—when my first master died.

No one grieved him; in the fields we hung our heads, keening, grieving for ourselves and the estate sale that must follow. He died very old. I saw him only at a distance: stooped, thin, asleep in a shaded chair on the lawn, a blanket at his lap. I think now he was like a specimen preserved in a bottle. He had outlived a mad king, outlived the slave trade itself, had seen the fall of the French Empire and the rise of the British and the dawn of the industrial age, and his usefulness, surely, had passed.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Washington Black by Esi Edugyan. Copyright (c) 2018 by Ides of March, Inc. All rights reserved. Excerpted by permission of Patrick Crean Editions, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. No part of this excerpt may be used or reproduced in any manner without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in reviews.

Published by Knopf Canada

Sheila Heti

Biography

Sheila Heti is the author of seven books, including the novel How Should a Person Be? which was named a New York Times Notable Book; the story collection The Middle Stories; and the novel Ticknor. Her books have been translated into twelve languages, and her writing has been featured in various publications, including the New York Times, London Review of Books, the New Yorker, n+ 1, McSweeney’s, Harper’s and the Believer. She lives in Toronto.

Jury Citation

A personal story, a feminist debate, a philosophical reflection on time, genealogy and Art – these are just some of the narrative strands that Sheila Heti weaves into Motherhood, a complex and defiant exploration of contemporary womanhood. As her narrator interrogates the spaces between motherhood and childlessness, other paths, other choices, emerge, including the possibilities of fiction itself. In her playful but precise prose, Heti turns interiority into an expansive landscape with life-altering implications for her narrator and anyone with an interest in the paradoxes of choice and the randomness of free will.

Excerpt

My mother cried for forty days and forty nights. As long as I have known her, I have known her to cry. I used to think that I would grow up to be a different sort of woman, that I would not cry, and that I would solve the problem of her crying. She could never tell me what was wrong except to say, I’m tired. Could it be that she was always tired? I wondered, when I was little, Doesn’t she know she’s unhappy? I thought the worst thing in the world would be to be unhappy, but not to know it. As I grew older, I compulsively checked myself for signs that I was unhappy. Then I grew unhappy, too. I grew filled up with tears.

View the full excerpt

 

Excerpted from Motherhood. Copyright © 2018 Sheila Heti. Excerpted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf Canada, a division of Penguin Random Canada Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Viking Canada

Thea Lim

Biography

Thea Lim’s writing has been published by the Southampton Review, the Guardian, Salon, the Millions, Bitch magazine, Utne Reader, and others, and she has received multiple awards and fellowships for her work. She holds an MFA from the University of Houston and she previously served as nonfiction editor at Gulf Coast. She grew up in Singapore and lives in Toronto.

Jury Citation

America is in the midst of a deadly flu pandemic. In order to afford medical treatment for her husband, a young woman agrees to travel through time. They agree to meet in the future. What is five minutes for her is twelve years for him. And, in the briefest of moments, they have become irreconcilable strangers. In an Ocean of Minutes, debut novelist, Thea Lim asks the reader to confront contemporary issues – social class, immigration, citizenship, corporate power, poverty, and the all too familiar, love and loss. The novel is beautifully written and guides us through a plot that moves backwards and forward – yet, never lets us go.

Excerpt

People wishing to time travel go to Houston Interconti¬nental Airport. At the orientation, the staff tell them that time travel is just like air travel, you even go to the same facility. People used to be apprehensive about airline travel too. But when you arrive at the airport, it is not the same at all. Before you can get within a mile of the terminals, you reach a bus stop moored at the edge of a vast concrete flat, where you must leave your vehicle and ascend a snaking trolley, like the ones they have at the zoo.

View the full excerpt

 

Excerpted from An Ocean of Minutes. Copyright © 2018 by Thea Lim. Excerpted by permission of Viking, an imprint of Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited, a Penguin Random House Company. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Longlist

The 2018 Scotiabank Giller Prize jury announced its longlist on Monday, September 16, 2018. The 12 titles were chosen from a field of 104 books submitted by publishers all across Canada. The longlist was selected by an esteemed five-member jury panel: Heather O’Neill, John Freeman, Kamal Al-Solyalee (Jury Chair), Maxine Bailey and Philip Hensher.

Of the 2018 longlist, the jury writes:

“We the jury devoted many, many delightful and arduous months of our lives coming up with this longlist. Our sole criteria going into this process was literary excellence. We were looking for books that were written in elevated, idiosyncratic, original prose that exhibited an exquisite command of the art of language, and unparalleled mastery of structure and storytelling. We argued viciously over books, expounding on their merits. But when the battle was over, what remained left us in awe. This list reflects the landscape of the current Canadian imagination: diverse, bold, edgy, exciting, reflective, aware, angry and joyous. Leave it to our literature to speak out beautifully from the far-flung edges of this huge mysterious land, and sing about the erased, the immigrants, the oppressed, the survivors, the entitled. It also reflects the myriad genres that Canadian writers are working in: auto-fiction, science-fiction, epic family sagas, historical novels, coming of age dramas, short-stories, satire. These are stories about and beyond Canada, a list so exciting, exhibiting such pure excellence, it stands up to any list in the world, and it is great, great fun to read.”

Published by A John Metcalf Book, an imprint of Biblioasis

Paige Cooper

Biography

Paige Cooper was born and raised in the Rocky Mountains. Her stories have appeared in The Fiddlehead, West Branch, Michigan Quarterly Review, Gulf Coast Online, Canadian Notes & Queries, The New Quarterly, Minola Review, Cosmonauts Avenue, and have been anthologized in The Journey Prize Stories and Best Canadian Stories. She lives in Montreal.

Excerpt

Simona will not come, so I go alone up the icy steps to the wine bar to find Lars sitting in tableau, dressed like a banker or a dean in a gold Windsor knot and blue shirt, white at cuff and collar, drinking a cappuccino with one knuckle through the cup’s ring hole. These days our free hours are spent in blackout. Daylight shows up to eat its lunch over our desks, then leaves. Otherwise, we and time are left to manage ourselves. If this were the morning dark Lars would have a newspaper, but it’s evening and his work is laid aside; here ’s a man who sits and reviews the day’s developments with clarity and logic. When Simona first introduced me to Lars, I thought: here is a man I would try to please if I worked under him. If he were my physician, I might lie about my habits.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Zolitude. Copyright © 2018 by Paige Cooper. Excerpted by permission of A John Metcalf Book, an imprint of Biblioasis. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by House of Anansi Press

Patrick DeWitt

Biography

Patrick DeWitt was born on Vancouver Island in 1975. He is the author of three critically acclaimed novels: Undermajordomo Minor, Ablutions, and The Sisters Brothers, which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, and the Stephen Leacock Medal, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Scotiabank Giller Prize. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

Excerpt

“All good things must end,” said Frances Price.

She was a moneyed, striking woman of sixty- five years, easing her hands into black calfskin gloves on the steps of a brownstone in New York City’s Upper East Side. Her son, Malcolm, thirty- two, stood nearby looking his usual broody and unkempt self. It was late autumn, dusk; the windows of the brownstone were lit, a piano sounded on the air— a tasteful party was occurring. Frances was explaining her early departure to a similarly wealthy though less lovely individual, this the hostess. Her name doesn’t matter. She was aggrieved.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from French Exit. Copyright © 2018 by Patrick DeWitt. Excerpted by permission of House of Anansi Press. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by QC Fiction, an imprint of Baraka Books

Eric Dupont

Biography

Born in 1970, Eric Dupont lives and works in Montreal. He has published 4 novels with Marchand de feuilles and in France with Éditions du Toucan and Éditions J’ai lu (Flammarion). He is a past winner of Radio-Canada’s “Combat des livres” (the equivalent of the CBC’s Canada Reads contest), a finalist for the Prix littéraire France-­Québec and the Prix des cinq continents, and a winner of the Prix des libraires and the Prix littéraire des collégiens. His fourth novel, Songs for the Cold of Heart (La fiancée américaine) translated by Peter McCambridge, has sold over 60,000 copies in Quebec alone.

Excerpt

Years before her mother bundled her onto a coach bound for New York City in a December blizzard, Madeleine Lamontagne had been a little girl who loved Easter bunnies, Christmas trees, and the stories told by her dad, Louis Lamontagne. Nothing out of the ordinary there. After all, everyone loved to hear Louis “The Horse” Lamontagne’s tall tales. Before television, his stories were the best way to pass the time in Rivi.re-du-Loup.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Songs for the Cold of Heart. Copyright © 2018 by Eric Dupont. English translation by Peter McCambridge. Excerpted by permission of QC Fiction, an imprint of Baraka Books. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Patrick Crean Editions, an imprint of HarperCollins Canada

Esi Edugyan

Biography

Esi Edugyan won the Scotiabank Giller Prize in 2011 for her novel Half-Blood Blues. The novel was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize, the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Orange Prize for Fiction. The author lives in Victoria, BC.

Excerpt

I might have been ten, eleven years old—I cannot say for certain—when my first master died.

No one grieved him; in the fields we hung our heads, keening, grieving for ourselves and the estate sale that must follow. He died very old. I saw him only at a distance: stooped, thin, asleep in a shaded chair on the lawn, a blanket at his lap. I think now he was like a specimen preserved in a bottle. He had outlived a mad king, outlived the slave trade itself, had seen the fall of the French Empire and the rise of the British and the dawn of the industrial age, and his usefulness, surely, had passed.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Washington Black by Esi Edugyan. Copyright (c) 2018 by Ides of March, Inc. All rights reserved. Excerpted by permission of Patrick Crean Editions, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. No part of this excerpt may be used or reproduced in any manner without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in reviews.

Published by Knopf Canada

Rawi Hage

Biography

Rawi Hage was born in Beirut, Lebanon. He immigrated to Canada in 1992 and now lives in Montreal. His first novel, De Niro’s Game, won the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Literary Award. Cockroach was the winner of the Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction and a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award. It was also shortlisted for the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Award and the Scotiabank Giller Prize. His third novel, Carnival, was a finalist for the Writers’ Trust Award and won the Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction. His work has been translated into 30 languages.

Excerpt

One sunny day at the start of a ceasefire, a father drove with his son down towards where the fighting had been. A cadaver had been lying on the ground for days, muti¬lated. The son, who was named Pavlov, and his father, an undertaker, loaded the remains into plastic bags and carried them to the hearse. The cadaver’s belly had been opened by a bullet wound and vermin had claimed it and multiplied inside the soft organs, gorging on the entrails. Father and son gathered the scattered items that belonged to the dead: a loose shoe, a bag filled with mouldy food, broken glasses.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Beirut Hellfire Society. Copyright © 2018 Rawi Hage. Excerpted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf Canada, a division of Penguin Random Canada Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Knopf Canada

Sheila Heti

Biography

Sheila Heti is the author of seven books, including the novel How Should a Person Be? which was named a New York Times Notable Book; the story collection The Middle Stories; and the novel Ticknor. Her books have been translated into twelve languages, and her writing has been featured in various publications, including the New York Times, London Review of Books, the New Yorker, n+ 1, McSweeney’s, Harper’s and the Believer. She lives in Toronto.

Excerpt

My mother cried for forty days and forty nights. As long as I have known her, I have known her to cry. I used to think that I would grow up to be a different sort of woman, that I would not cry, and that I would solve the problem of her crying. She could never tell me what was wrong except to say, I’m tired. Could it be that she was always tired? I wondered, when I was little, Doesn’t she know she’s unhappy? I thought the worst thing in the world would be to be unhappy, but not to know it. As I grew older, I compulsively checked myself for signs that I was unhappy. Then I grew unhappy, too. I grew filled up with tears.

View the full excerpt

 

Excerpted from Motherhood. Copyright © 2018 Sheila Heti. Excerpted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf Canada, a division of Penguin Random Canada Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Hamish Hamilton Canada

Emma Hooper

Biography

Raised in Alberta, Emma Hooper is a musician and writer. As a musician, her solo project “Waitress for the Bees” tours internationally and has earned her a Finnish Cultural Knighthood. Her debut novel, Etta and Otto and Russell and James, was an international bestseller and was published in 24 countries. She is a research-lecturer at Bath Spa University, but comes home to Canada to cross-country ski as much as she can afford.

Excerpt

There was a mermaid, said Finn.

Yes, said Cora. She pulled an old towel up over her, a blanket.

Out on the dark green night water, said Finn, there was a mer¬maid. And, because mermaids need to, it sang. Sad songs, homesick songs. Night after night, over a hundred thousand fish. And the only one who could hear it was a girl.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Our Homesick Songs. Copyright © 2018 by Emma Hooper. Excerpted by permission of Hamish Hamilton, an imprint of Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited, a Penguin Random House Company. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Viking Canada

Thea Lim

Biography

Thea Lim’s writing has been published by the Southampton Review, the Guardian, Salon, the Millions, Bitch magazine, Utne Reader, and others, and she has received multiple awards and fellowships for her work. She holds an MFA from the University of Houston and she previously served as nonfiction editor at Gulf Coast. She grew up in Singapore and lives in Toronto.

Excerpt

People wishing to time travel go to Houston Interconti¬nental Airport. At the orientation, the staff tell them that time travel is just like air travel, you even go to the same facility. People used to be apprehensive about airline travel too. But when you arrive at the airport, it is not the same at all. Before you can get within a mile of the terminals, you reach a bus stop moored at the edge of a vast concrete flat, where you must leave your vehicle and ascend a snaking trolley, like the ones they have at the zoo.

View the full excerpt

 

Excerpted from An Ocean of Minutes. Copyright © 2018 by Thea Lim. Excerpted by permission of Viking, an imprint of Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited, a Penguin Random House Company. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Astoria, an imprint of House of Anansi Press

Lisa Moore

Biography

Lisa Moore is the acclaimed author of the novels Caught, February, and Alligator. Caught was a finalist for Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction and the Scotiabank Giller Prize and is now a major CBC television series starring Allan Hawco. February won CBC’s Canada Reads competition, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, and was named a New Yorker Best Book of the Year, and a Globe and Mail Top 100 Book. Alligator was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (Canada and the Caribbean), and was a national bestseller. Her story collection Open was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and a national bestseller. She lives in St. John’s, Newfoundland.

Excerpt

Do you feel that? Steve asks. The customer, a leggy junior high school teacher, has just taken up running.

Steve rubs small circles on the inside of his own knee.

Right there, he says. He doesn’t break eye contact. The customer has large grey eyes and a habit of hyper-rapid blinking that suggests permanent incredulity. But her weak, caving chin gives Steve hope.

The customer reaches down to touch the inside of her knee, unconsciously mirroring him. Rubbing little circles. She blinks.

I guess so, she says. Then she says: Yes.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Something for Everyone. Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Moore. Excerpted by permission of Astoria, an imprint of House of Anansi Press. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Viking Canada

Tanya Tagaq

Biography

Tanya Tagaq is an improvisational performer, avant-garde composer, and experimental recording artist who won the 2014 Polaris Music Prize for her album Animism, a work that disrupted the music world in Canada and beyond with its powerfully original vision. Tanya’s most recent album Retribution was released in fall 2016. Split Tooth is her first novel.

Excerpt

Sometimes we would hide in the closet when the drunks came home from the bar. Knee to knee, we would sit, hiding, hoping nobody would discover us. Every time it was different. Sometimes there was only thumping, screaming, moans, laughter. Sometimes the old woman would come in and smother us with her suffering love. Her love so strong and heavy it seemed a burden. Even then I knew that love could be a curse. Her love for us made her cry. The past became a river that was released by her eyes. The poison of alcohol on her breath would fill the room. She would wail and grab at us, kissing us, kissing the only things she could trust.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Split Tooth. Copyright © 2018 by Tanya Tagaq. Excerpted by permission of Viking, an imprint of Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited, a Penguin Random House Company. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Random House Canada

Sheila Fischman

Biography

Kim Thúy, born in Saigon, left Vietnam in1968 with the boat people at the age of ten and settled with her family in Quebec. A graduate in translation and law, she has worked as a seamstress, interpreter, lawyer, restaurant owner, and commentator on radio and television. She lives in Montreal and devotes herself to writing.

Excerpt

I was eight years old when our house was plunged into silence.

Under the fan fixed to the ivory wall of the dining room, a large bright-red sheet of rigid cardboard held a block of three hundred and sixty-five sheets of paper. On each was marked the month, the day of the week, and two dates: one according to the solar calendar, the other according to the lunar calendar. As soon as I was able to climb onto a chair, the task of tearing off a page was reserved for me when I woke up.

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Excerpted from Vi. Copyright © 2016 Éditions Libre Expression. English translation copyright © 2018 Sheila Fischman. Excerpted by permission of Random House Canada, a division of Penguin Random Canada Limited. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Published by Arsenal Pulp Press

Joshua Whitehead

Biography

Joshua Whitehead is an Oji-Cree/nehiyaw, Two-Spirit/Indigiqueer member of Peguis First Nation (Treaty 1). He is the author of Full-Metal Indigiqueer and the winner of the Governor General’s History Award for the Indigenous Arts and Stories Challenge in 2016. Currently he is working on a PhD in Indigenous Literatures and Cultures in the University of Calgary’s English department (Treaty 7). Jonny Appleseed is his first novel.

Excerpt

I figured out that I was gay when I was eight. I liked to stay up late after everyone went to bed and watch Queer as Folk on my kokum’s TV. She had a satellite and all the channels, pirated of course. At the time, my mom and I were living with my kokum because my dad had left us—I think he took Loretta Lynn a little too seriously because one day he never did come home after drinking. Queer as Folk was on at midnight; I muted the channel with the subtitles turned on so no one would hear it, and turned down the brightness so the glaring light wouldn’t shine underneath their doors like the goddamn poltergeist.

View the full excerpt

Excerpted from Jonny Appleseed. Copyright © 2018 by Joshua Whitehead. Excerpted by permission of Arsenal Pulp Press. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Jury

The Scotiabank Giller Prize is pleased to announce the award-winning, five-member jury panel for the 2018 prize. They are: Heather O’Neill, John Freeman, Kamal Al-Solyalee, Maxine Bailey and Philip Hensher.

Kamal Al-Solaylee

Biography

Kamal Al-Solaylee is the author of Intolerable: A Memoir of Extremes, shortlisted for the Writers’ Trust Hilary Weston Prize for Nonfiction and winner of the Toronto Book Award, and Brown: What Being Brown in the World Today Means (to Everyone), a Governor General Literary Awards finalist and winner of the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing. He was previously a theatre critic at the Globe and Mail and over the past two decades has written on books, the performing arts, and politics for The Walrus, Toronto Star, Literary Review of Canada, Quill & Quire, Elle Canada, Canadian Notes & Queries and Maclean’s. Al-Solaylee is a professor of journalism at Ryerson University.16.

Maxine Bailey

Biography

Maxine Bailey is the Vice-President of Advancement for the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF). Prior to TIFF she was in theatre and co-wrote the award-winning play Sistahs. An active member in arts and community-based projects, she co-founded the Black Artists Network in Dialogue (BAND) which showcases black cultural contributions nationally and internationally. She participates in the advisory boards and steering committees for the Toronto Arts Council, the City of Toronto’s Film, Television and Digital Media Board, The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery Board and the Ontario Cultural Attractions Fund.

John Freeman

Biography

John Freeman is the founder of the literary biannual Freeman’s and author of several books including Maps, a collection of poems; How to Read a Novelist, profiles of leading writers; and The Tyranny of Email, a study of electronic communication and its effect on us. He has assembled two anthologies about inequality in the United States: Tales of Two Cities, which focused on New York City and Tales of Two Americas. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Paris Review and been translated into more than 20 languages. The former editor of Granta, Freeman lives in New York City where he teaches at The New School and is Writer in Residence at NYU.

Philip Hensher

Biography

Philip Hensher was born in London. His novels include Kitchen Venom, which won the Somerset Maugham Award, The Northern Clemency, which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, King of the Badgers, and Scenes from Early Life, which won the Ondaatje Prize. His most recent novel is The Friendly Ones. He also wrote the libretto for Thomas Ades’s opera Powder Her Face and edited The Penguin Book of the British Short Story. He was a Granta Best of Young British Novelist in 2002, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature from 1999. Among his distinctions is an honorary doctorate from Sheffield University. He is Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Bath Spa and lives in London and Geneva.

Heather O’Neill

Biography

Heather O’Neill is a novelist, short story writer, poet and essayist. Her work, which includes Lullabies for Little Criminals, The Girl Who Was Saturday Night, Daydreams of Angels and The Lonely Hearts Hotel, has been shortlisted for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction, The Orange Prize for Fiction and the Scotiabank Giller Prize in two consecutive years, and has won CBC Canada Reads, The Paragraphe MacLennan Prize for Fiction and the Danuta Gleed Award. Born and raised in Montreal, O’Neill lives there today.